Me Made May ’16, and how to style a peasant blouse

Peasant blouses worn with pants are basically my daily uniform, the go-to outfit I exist in at all times. It’s also May, which means Me-Made-May’16, and though I don’t post daily outfit photos I have diligently been practicing my me-made-may pledges to wear something I made myself every day, for several years now. So much so, in fact, that for the past two years in a row I’ve worn a self-made item every single day. I was almost shocked to realize this when May rolled around this year. And also quite pleased: making my own clothes and honoring makers and all things handmade has become a daily practice and life philosophy.

Do you have a daily uniform you love? Kristi McDonough from Schnitzel & Boo has a great post up over at Sew Mama Sew about her go-to indie patterns that would work great for a handmade spring-to-summer wardrobe – I was so thrilled she included the Zsálya in her list! My Zsályas are still some of my favorites but today I wanted to show you how I wear some other folksy blouses I made recently.

First up, my Uptown folk blouse (the pattern is still available for free at the Sew News web site, through May 31st!). For this embroidered version, I like to go full-out 1930s and wear them with high-waisted palazzo pants, and my favorite Ariat Western boots. I’ve been obsessed with these pants lately: I love really, really love how they look with peasant blouses, defining the waist and elongating one’s silhouette. I don’t remember where I got the fabric for these pants – it’s some kind of eco-friendly blend I’ve had for years, probably linen, cotton, and recycled polyester.

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Then there’s the upcycled Old Navy blouse from my previous post, with the Faraway Garden embroidery on the front. I like these with ankle-length, narrowish culottes, and Fly London shoes. The culottes are essentially the same pattern as the wide-leg pants above, except that the pants legs are shorter and straight. I used Robert Kaufman Essex Linen in navy for these.

 

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And finally: joggers!

Joggers of all kinds are all the rage these days – you see them everywhere on the street and there are a number of great indie designer jogger pants patterns out there too. Also, did you know there are multiple ways to tuck a shirt into your waistband, by the way? I didn’t! I found out from Rae Hoekstra’s post about what kinds of shoes to wear with her Luna pants pattern. She also has a great post about how other bloggers have made/styled the Luna recently – full of fun ideas.

 

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Well, it also turns out that joggers pair really well with peasant blouses. Shown above with my non-embroidered version of the Uptown blouse with a pair of Luna pants I made recently, and Swedish Hasbeens for the shoes. I incorporated two details from a favorite pair of joggers that are getting a little threadbare from all the love I’ve been giving them: an exposed zipper at the ankle and a patch pocket with a slanted welt detail.

 
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Apologies for the wrinkly detail photo! I should have ironed the pants before photographing but, well, it wasn’t meant to be.

I do love this pocket and, in general, exposed zippers at the ankles, especially when there’s elastic or gathers ALSO involved. I wanted to toughen up the soft, feminine vibe of the peasant blouse, and the menswear-inspired pocket and moto-ish zipper do the job nicely. The fabric is another one I’ve had in my stash that I can’t remember the source of, like for the palazzos. It’s the kind of thing I’ve seen pants for hiking made out of, but eco-friendly because the polyester portion of the blend is recycled. So hey, these pants are eco-friendly on top of being handmade! The only other change I made to the original Luna pattern was to take out a bit of ease at the sides. I suspect I’ll be making more of these.

 

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5 Responses to Me Made May ’16, and how to style a peasant blouse

  1. francesca says:

    Oh, I love these pants with the blouses! My favourite shape – actually the only shape of pants I wear (obsessed with 30s lines….) I’ve used Colette’s Juniper, a McCall’s pattern and am now trying the 1940s pattern from Evaexpress. But this high waisted style is great. Is it from Decades of Style?

    I too reached a point last year when it was strange if I wasn’t wearing me-made:).

    • Kati says:

      The high-waisted style is my pattern. If all goes well I’ll be getting it graded soon! Thank you for the vote of confidence! It’s based on something I have from the 1930s.

      • Francesca Amodeo says:

        Oh wow! I can’t wait! I love 30s lines and my wardrobe is loosely based on those with a touch of 50s :)… without looking too vintage though, it’s more the silhouettes I love. I am steadily working my way through all the 30s/early 40s style patterns I can find – including one genuine one – Colette’s Juniper (nice leg shape but too low waisted especially in front), Smooth sailing, Evadress’s 40s pants, and am now about to try decades of style’s and a simplicity one. I love the look of these and will grab the pattern when you publish it! I do hope you will be doing paper…..

  2. Rae Hoekstra says:

    These are so great!! Still can’t get over those awesome details you added to Luna. And love your other outfits as well — I love those palazzo pants and the embroidery details are fantastic!! So great.

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